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Posted on 17-Oct-2015


Bottle Collecting

Posted on 22-Oct-2015

Displaying your bottles

What should you fill your bottles with?

Ok. So you collect empty bottles and you want to display them with liquid to simulate how it looked when full of perfume. Never put water into a bottle. Period. Never do this. You will ruin the bottle, creating a haze inside the bottle as the water evaporates, and the stopper will become so wedged it will break when someone tries to pull it out.

Here is an example of a water filled bottle. Burn this image into your mind and remember it when you consider filling your bottles with water. If you already have some that way, then dump that water out and rinse your bottle with distilled water, RO water, or drinking alcohol if you have some. Then let it dry upside down on some paper towels for 30 minutes, and then after all the water has run down on the paper towel turn it right side up and let it air dry completely. It can take up to a week to get all the water out if the neck is small. If you rinsed it with alcohol and want to leave the alcohol in the bottle that is ok.

It is always better to put alcohol or perfume into a bottle than it is to fill it with water. Here is another example of a bottle that had water in it but someone managed to empty it and now has it for sale on ebay. See the awful hazing inside the bottle.

Guerlain perfume bottles

Posted on 25-Oct-2015

How to determine volume

Ok. So here is a reason why you should always measure the volume of a bottle. Three Guerlain bottles almost the same size. From different glass manufacturers and each is a different volume inside the bottle. The visual size difference is so slight it can fool an expert. The bottle on the left is a 1/2 oz size from the 1940s. The middle bottle is from the 1930-40s and is a 2/3 oz. And the bottle on the right is a 1 oz size from the 1920s. Yes. It's a 1 oz bottle with patent registration and tax stamp on the bottom. Notice the difference from the side view. Also look at how the bottom looks. The sizes are as follows. 1/2 oz is 2 7/8". 2/3 oz is 3 1/2". And the 1 oz is 3" tall. It matters how thick the glass is, how thick the bottom is and how deep is the bottle from font to back. Hope this helps someone.

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